Posts Tagged ‘ Michel Foucault ’

Rape Culture: Extreme Pornography / Extreme Sexuality (Part 3.1)

Extreme Sexuality 1

The Liberation Principle

“The Matrix is surely the kind of film about the matrix that the matrix would have been able to produce” (Baudrillard, 2004)

As free-market globalisation and the artificial instruments of technology have intersected with the formerly established sex categories of male and female; and as discourse was liberated from its containment within these essentialist categories, an identity continuum was born right across the sex/gender spectrum. An identity continuum that liberated sex from its biological and social poles, opening it up as a market of unlimited, polymorphic potential.[1]

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Rape Culture: Extreme Pornography / Extreme Sexuality (Part 1)

“When the world knows beauty as beauty, ugliness arises
When it knows good as good, evil arises
Thus being and non-being produce each other”
(Laozi, Tao Te Ching)
Today, there is much talk about ‘rape culture’: about whether or not it exists; about whether or not it elides with ‘rape fantasy’; about whether Continue reading

Against Analysis

“To produce is to force what belongs to another order (that of secrecy and seduction) to materialize.” (Baudrillard, Forget Foucault, pg. 37)

Preamble

The following is a reflection on a tendency of modern, techno- informational capitalist societies: the tendency to ‘analyse’, become ‘self-conscious’, to ‘decide’ or ‘choose’. It is a tendency which is demonstrated in David Foster-Wallace’s This is Water commencement speech and its character is exampled by the following excerpt:

“’Learning how to think’ really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think. It means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and to choose how you construct meaning from experience.” (David Foster-Wallace, This is Water, 8:10)

As a background, it is worth noting that Continue reading

Sound without Meaning: Language and Disintegration

“The same separation of sight and sound and meaning that is peculiar to the phonetic alphabet also extends to its social and psychological effects. Literate man undergoes much separation of his imaginative, emotional and sense life, as Rousseau (and later the Romantic poets and philosophers) proclaimed long ago.” (McLuhan, Understanding Media,p. 124)”

At the heart of phonetic writing we may find a death in experiential aura and as such, cultural communication. What phonetic writing does, as opposed to the ideogram or pictograph, Continue reading