Posts Tagged ‘ Icon ’

Digital Mythologies / Digital Plagues (Part 2)

The Text and a Context for Prosumption

To give meaning to a text, it shouldn’t simply entertain you; it should be allowed to interweave itself inextricably into the fabric of your life. To this extent, the text still lives – Continue reading

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Some Thoughts on K-Punk @ Virtual Futures 2011

“We believed that the cybernetic approach to consciousness – whipped up frothy – would carry us to a plateau overlooking a pleasant mirror, but instead left us blathering in a dressed up solitude of manikin planets, twirling in a blank and unfriendly spaciousness.” (Steven Jesse Bernstein: The Sport Pt.1 – Prison)

During 2011’s Virtual Futures conference at Warwick University, Mark Fisher (K-Punk) presented some reservations about the internet and mobile technologies, emphasizing their depersonalising, commodifying and anxiety producing aspects and making the claim that we got on OK prior to their appearance (See Here for Talk). The following is a catalogue of thoughts and observations that occurred in response to that talk. Continue reading

Form and Content: The Disappearance of Ideology

In my last post on Murdoch, I made the following observation: that Continue reading

Existential, Relational and Spectacular Space

In a previous article on Conflict Narratives, we saw two areas of social exchange – the relational or experiential space (made up of direct involvement with events and other people) and the spectacular or universal space (made up of cultural and creative projections onto TV screens, into books, magazines etc. Essentially Spectacular Space is made up of shared, communal media).

It is the quality of direct, relational experience Continue reading

Lady Gaga (The Iconic Medium)

“Madonna is desperately seeking a body able to generate illusion, a naked body consumed by its own appearance. She would like to be naked, but she never manages it. She is perpetually harassed, if not by leather and metal, then by the obscene desire to be naked, by the artificial mannerism of exhibition. But this produces total inhibition and, for the spectator, radical frigidity. So, paradoxically she ends up personifying the frenetic frigidity of our age.” (Baudrillard, The Perfect Crime p. 127)

Prior to reading Camille Paglia’s ‘explosive’ article on Lady Gaga, I thought I’d have to work to bring out every interesting motif in Gaga’s work. As it happens, Continue reading